Tag Archives: evangelism

Motorcycle Evangelism

I was in Grade 2 and it was my first effort at evangelism, or at least to try and invite someone to church.  Our family was living in the Arctic town of Inuvik and we were attending the local Baptist church.  My Sunday School teacher was outward looking and tried to teach us church kids to be the same.  She encouraged us to invite our friends to come to church so they could hear the gospel.

Nicky lived on the same street as us, a few doors down.  Like me, his father was an RCMP officer — he was a street cop, my Dad a pilot.  Nicky was also in my class at the Sir Alexander Mackenzie School.  Unlike me, he was a Newfie; he had this quirky Newfoundland accent.  He and his family were also not church-going folk.

One day I was hanging out over at Nicky’s place.  What my Sunday School teacher said was weighing on my mind.  So I said to Nicky, “Hey, do you want go to church with me on Sunday?”  Nicky replied, “Nah, I don’t go to church and I don’t wanna.”  I stopped for a moment and thought.  Nicky needed an incentive.  So I said, “If you come, you’ll get one of these really neat pencils.”  I showed him the pencil I got at Sunday school.  It had all these colours associated with Jesus and the gospel and then Bible verses in tiny print to explain what each meant.  Nicky wasn’t impressed:  “I don’t need a stupid pencil.  Nah, I told you, I don’t wanna go to church.”

He was stubborn.  I had to up the ante.  Clearly he needed a bigger incentive than a pencil.  I thought of something Nicky would regard as irresistibly cool.  With the most persuasion I could muster, I told him, “If you come, they’ll give you a motorbike!”  I don’t how I came up with that whopper, but it certainly didn’t work.  Nicky just said, “No way, I don’t believe you.  No church would give away a motorbike.  Nope, not comin’.”  Nicky never did come to church with me.

I was in Grade 2.  So perhaps you can forgive me for being an evangelist whose honesty didn’t match his zeal.  In my desire to achieve the goal, I tried to appeal to the greed naturally resident in human hearts.  But, in aiming so high, my pitch was transparently unbelievable, even to a kid in Grade 2.

Sadly, some of what passes for evangelism doesn’t get much beyond my Grade 2 efforts.  The human heart isn’t naturally drawn to the gospel message of rescue for sinners through the cross of Christ.  In their natural condition, human hearts don’t find that message attractive or persuasive.  Christ crucified is “a stumbling block to Jews and folly to Gentiles” (1 Cor. 1:23).  Yet some try to share the good news in a way that promises things the Bible doesn’t.  Maybe not motorbikes, but certainly health, wealth, and prosperity:  “If you come to Christ, you’ll be blessed materially.  Your health will be better.  Your relationships will improve.”  Such incentives are really no different to a Grade 2 kid telling his friend to come to church so he can get a motorbike.

I often think of the memorable words of C.S. Lewis in God in the Dock:

As you perhaps know, I haven’t always been a Christian. I didn’t go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of Port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don’t recommend Christianity.

Lewis was right.  Becoming a Christian is going to mean struggle and difficulty.  It means bearing a cross, dying to yourself, killing sin.  From a this-world perspective, there isn’t much (if anything) to commend it.

So, how do we make the gospel persuasive?  Or:  how do we even just make a case for someone to join us for Sunday worship at a church service?  Here’s the thing:  the power of persuasion ultimately isn’t in us.  Our calling is simply to speak the truth in love.  We’re called to share the gospel with whomever we can.  Now 1 Peter 3:15 says you should be prepared to give an answer if someone asks you, “Why?”  Why should someone believe the gospel?  Because it’s the way to be rescued from the judgment we deserve and it’s the way back to the way things should be in terms of how we relate to our Creator.  Why should someone come to church?  Because, we tell them, there they’re going to hear the best news available to humanity.  In a world of bad news and worse news, a faithful Christian church is going to herald the good news of who Jesus is and what he’s done.

When we say true things like that, God may be at work in that person’s heart with his Holy Spirit.  The words we speak may be God’s instrument to persuade and draw that person in to Christ.  Or perhaps not.  Ultimately the persuasion isn’t in our power.  God persuades when he chooses to do so.  We just have to speak the truth.


Pastoral Q & A: Should We Call Unbelievers “Pre-Christians”?

While it’s not overwhelming or huge, there seems to be a bit of a trend to refer to unbelievers as “pre-Christians.”  A parishioner attended another church in our state recently and came across this way of speaking and asked me about it.  Is it acceptable to substitute “pre-Christian” for “non-Christian” or “unbeliever”?

If we turn to Scripture, the word “unbeliever” is used 14 times in the New Testament.  It’s used to translate the Greek word apistos.  Sometimes the word “Gentile” (Gr. ethnos) is used to refer to those who aren’t Christians, extending the Old Testament idea of the pagan nations surrounding Israel.  In Ephesians 2:3, non-Christians are referred to as “children of wrath.”  Later in the same chapter, they are “strangers to the covenants of promise” (2:12) and “aliens” (2:19).  However, the standard word in Scripture is simply “unbeliever.”  The word “pre-Christian” is not used at all.

Nevertheless, there is no issue with using a non-scriptural word if it captures a biblical concept.  The classic example is the word “Trinity” – it’s not used in the Bible, but the concept is definitely there.  So, can a biblical case be made for referring to unbelievers as “pre-Christians”?

I can appreciate the positive attitude this term is meant to convey.  When we give a Christian witness to someone, we certainly hope that the Holy Spirit will use our witness to bring someone to faith in Christ.  We pray in that way and perhaps we should pray more expectantly than we often do.

Yet the fact of the matter is that we don’t know God’s plans for the salvation of any given person.  Scripture reveals a doctrine of election:  God has chosen some to eternal life before the foundation of the world (Eph. 1:4).  But we don’t know who they are and neither should we presume to know.   Instead, we address each person with the thought that only God knows whether or not that person is going to be a Christian.  Our calling is not to guess or assume an outcome, but simply to present the gospel.

There is another aspect to this.  From the point of view of a non-Christian, adopting the language “pre-Christian” could also be offensive.  When I was in seminary, I attended a book club once or twice.  Some of the other attendees were Reformed Baptists.  One of them jokingly referred to me as a “Reformed-Baptist-in-training.”  I knew he was just kidding around and so it didn’t bother me.  Friends can banter like that.  But couldn’t this language of “pre-Christian” be unnecessarily offensive to an unbeliever just off the street?  If I put myself in those shoes, I would think:  “What arrogance!  They think they’re definitely going to make me a Christian.”  The gospel is offensive enough on its own; we don’t need to add offense with unnecessary and presumptuous terminology.

So in the interests of humble modesty about God’s plans, and in the interests of avoiding unnecessary offense in our witness, it’s best just to use the standard biblical terminology.  If someone isn’t a Christian, then we ought to just say they’re an unbeliever or a non-Christian.  Keep it simple.


Uber Evangelism

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I’m always on the look out for creative ways to share the gospel.  This past weekend I was in Singapore speaking at a Reformation Day Conference.  This conference was organized by the First Evangelical Reformed Church of Singapore.  One of the elders of the church was driving me back to my accommodations on Sunday evening and we were chatting about all kinds of different things.  As we pulled up to the housing complex, this retired man casually mentioned something he does with his time during the week:  he’s an Uber driver.  If you’re not familiar with it, Uber is a popular ride-sharing service.  Uber offers an app that connects people who want rides with people who can provide rides.  This brother uses Uber as an opportunity to share the gospel with strangers.  He keeps a supply of evangelistic tracts in his car and hands them out to whoever it is that he picks up.  While he’s driving, he often engages in conversations with his passengers and sometimes those conversations lead to the gospel.  He’ll also be listening to sermons or Christian music as he drives.  This is a great example of using the opportunities God gives to spread the good news of Christ!


Sometimes I Still Don’t Get It

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I blew it the other day.  I had an amazing opportunity to share the gospel with people who might not otherwise hear and I messed it up.  Almost a week later and I’m still kicking myself for a bush league mistake.  Before I confess the nature of my goof-up, let me give some back story here.

When I was a university student many moons ago, we had an evangelistic effort at the University of Alberta called the Areopagus Project (named after the place Paul addressed the Athenians in Acts 17).  Part of the Areopagus Project involved a literature table in a high-traffic location on campus.  One day a week, we had students taking turns at manning this table.  We handed out Bibles, but also tracts and other Christian literature.  Being an aspiring writer, I decided to have a run at writing a couple of tracts myself.

Around the same time, the Internet was this brand new thing, and on the Internet there was this Reformed e-mail discussion list called “Ref-net.”  I was one of the early contributors.  It started off as a thing amongst CanRC university students, but eventually morphed to include all sorts of other people.  The Ref-net was a good place to throw ideas out there and get some feedback.  I took the tracts I had written and posted them to the Ref-net and asked for input.  I’ll always be grateful for something Angelina wrote.  She said that we have to be careful with our Christian jargon.  There are a lot of terms that we use as Christians and we take for granted the meaning of these terms.   We expect that an unbeliever is going to right away understand all our biblical and theological vocabulary.  Angelina gave me some concrete suggestions for improving these tracts in that regard — terms that I needed to explain if I was going to use them or, better yet, use words that an average unbeliever will immediately grasp.  I took the lesson to heart.

I also tried to take the lesson to the mission field.  When I became a missionary in 2000, I kept Angelina’s advice in mind.  Whenever I taught and preached, I always tried to remember that I was speaking to people who were not only limited in their English comprehension (as speakers of English as a second language), but also rather biblically illiterate.  I always had to be conscientious of my audience and try to keep things as simple as possible.  Even today as a pastor in a regular church, I don’t expect that every one is going to always immediately remember the meaning of words like justification, sanctification, or propitiation.  Explain, explain, explain.  Try not to take anything for granted.  You could have someone in the pews who’s listening, really listening, for the first time.  It could be a visitor, but it could also be a young member who’s finally starting to listen, or maybe even an older member who otherwise daydreams.  Lay it out for them.

So there I was last week at a funeral facing a large audience made up mostly of folks who rarely, if ever, walk through the doors of a church.  I was asked to preach on Psalm 23.  This psalm presents incredible evangelistic potential and I tried to work with that.  It’s not hard to preach Christ from Psalm 23.  As I was preaching, I had a well-placed source in the audience who couldn’t help but pay attention to some of the reactions around her.  I spoke repeatedly about how David was saying this and saying that.  Audience members were heard to say to one another, “Why is he talking about David?  It’s Bryan’s funeral.  He keeps saying the wrong name!”  Face palm.  That’s my face.  My palm.  My bad.  I failed to say anything about the author of the Psalm as background — I just assumed that everyone knew that King David from the Old Testament wrote Psalm 23.  It wasn’t in the program with the Bible reading either.  That name “David” just dropped out of the sky and it confused and distracted listeners.  I over-estimated the biblical literacy of my audience and it presented somewhat of an obstacle to my presentation of the gospel message.

Normally I try to keep these things in mind, but this time around I dropped the ball.  Now you might say that it’s not a big deal, that the Holy Spirit can still work through a jar of clay even with a less-than-perfect message.  Yes, I believe that too and it does give me comfort.  And have I ever preached anything else besides a less-than-perfect message?  No, even my best sermons are stained with sin and plagued by weakness.  Yet I still want to be as effective a gospel communicator as I can.  After all, souls are in the balance.  I feel the weight of eternity on me every time I preach.  As I looked at all the faces in front of me last week, I remembered that they are all either going to heaven or hell — forever.  It’s ultimately in God’s hands, but I want to be his instrument so that they can know Christ and eternal life in him.  Because he is worthy, I want to honour him with a full-on effort where no one can walk away and say that they didn’t get it.  They might not believe, but they should still be able to know exactly what they’re rejecting.  Responding to the message is their responsibility.  Giving a clear message to which they have to respond is mine.  Should God give me another chance, I’m going to try and remember Angelina’s advice.

 


Mack Stiles: Basic Principles for Sharing the Gospel

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I’m almost finished the big pile of books I received last year at Together for the Gospel.  This little volume by J. Mack Stiles is one of them and it’s outstanding in many respects.  I appreciate the way in which he ties evangelism tightly to the local church and its ordinary ministry.  He wants churches to foster a culture of evangelism.  What he means is that evangelism is not something we tack on to the church (like a program), but it needs to be at the core of everything we do and everything we are as believers gathered in a church.  Evangelism doesn’t necessarily mean changing what we do, but changing the attitudes with which we do it.  The church should encourage believers to be compassionate and intentional with the lost that God has already placed in their lives and praying for him to bring more in their lives.

As we have these relationships with the lost, we pray for opportunities to share the gospel.  Stiles has a helpful set of basic principles to use in spiritual conversations with people:

  • Give yourself grace when you share your faith.  I’ve noticed that I often fear evangelism because there are so many ways to go wrong.  I can flub the message.  I can keep silent when I need to speak.  I can say things that later I think were stupid.  But it’s good to remind yourself that even your mistakes can help you become a better ambassador.
  • Meet people where they are.
  • Look for open doors.  A culture of evangelism is helpful here.  When church members share about the open doors they have seen around them, other members might hear opportunities with which to get involved.
  • Be compassionate and maintain a tender heart toward others.  Be careful to remember that you are a sinner.  Humility commends the gospel.
  • Remember that we have the answers to life’s biggest questions.  That’s something you can offer.  When the reality of life pierces through the superficial barriers that keep people from God, that’s where you can shine the light of the gospel.  Don’t hide it under a basket.
  • Focus on people’s separation from God, not on being morally upright.
  • Be intentional in your conversation.  Plan out what you will say.  This helps you to say things that are helpful, and not say things that are awkward or offensive.
  • Acknowledge what we know and what we don’t.  Kim’s phrase, ‘a sin-sick world,’ acknowledges the truth we see around us.  The Christian does well in that environment because he or she knows how it got that way.  I also find it helpful to tell people that I don’t always know the whys of what God does, but that I trust him as the one who makes sense in a broken world.
  • It’s good (though not required) to ask permission to share the message of the gospel.
  • Ask lots of questions.  Be a good listener.
  • Finally, if you anticipate a certain issue in a person’s life, it’s good to be acquainted with it by reading a book or talking with someone who knows about the issue.  (Stiles, Evangelism, 104-105)